I programmed a CNC robot to paint on canvas various samples of white noise coming from sources like old televisions and telecommunication antennas. In this way, the electric impulses are translated into strokes of paint. 
The material qualities of each painting are determined by the agency of the machine and its ability to translate or to inscribe the signals coming from the antenna, as well as by the way in which I interact with the machine.
It is believed that 1% of white noise seen in analog televisions comes from a signal remnant from the Big Bang. And while it’s impossible to map such energy, I'm interested in the poetic possibilities of such exploration.


Throughout the years, I have researched and produced work related with a form of electromagnetic signal remnant of the Big Bang called the Cosmic Microwave Background. It is believed that up to 1% of the white noise seen in analog televisions accounts from such signal (a form of fossil light). And while it would be hard to identify and map this energy using a regular UHF television antenna, I am interested in the poetic possibilities of its exploration.

I programmed a CNC machine to paint on canvases by using various samples of analog white noise signals, feed to a computer through an analog UHF television antenna. The electric impulses coming from the antenna are translated into strokes of paint, which the machine paints automatically.

As expected, the antenna picks up constant electromagnetic noise, as well as interferences from different sources, which make the resulting paintings and drawings all different. In addition, the software can be configured to change the resolution of the image (distance between strokes).

Each painting corresponds to a single moment or a snapshot of the signal, which opens up possibilities to have more –or less– of the Cosmic Microwave Background, at least on an poetic registry.

The material qualities of each painting are determined by the agency of the machine and its ability to translate or to inscribe the signals coming from the antenna, as well as by the way in which the artist interacts with the machine.

I have created a series of forty paintings and several drawings using this technique, which has rendered a wide variety of results. The collection of paintings will continue to grow into different sizes.